If movies are based on a series of photo frames moving rapidly, how come you can shoot movies at night?

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Mrmojo6068 asked:

When you take photos with digital cameras at night, it may take 20-30 seconds (or more) to take a photo. I don’t understand how you can shoot movies with darkly lit scenes if each shot (frame) takes longer to shoot. Why do the rules of photography not apply to movies if movies are based on photography? Thanks!!!

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3 Responses to “If movies are based on a series of photo frames moving rapidly, how come you can shoot movies at night?”
  1. TG Says:

    Movie cameras are very different from your personal camera. Some can film in very low light, and scenes are always very carefully lit to give the director exactly the exposure they want. It takes no longer to film at night than during the day, but lighting has to be carefully done. If youylook at some old films, it’s obvious that the night scenes were shot during the day through filters, as the cameras then had just the problem you refer to.

  2. Will Foster Says:

    Well, they are very similar actually, the video camera with low light actually slows down when trying to collect light when shooting with low-light. Most of the time, video cameras… same as a still camera… post editing can manipulate the image to appear as if it was shot at night…

  3. perki88 Says:

    I’ve been on the set of a TV show shot at night and you’d be amazed at how many bright lights they actually use!

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